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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
city facing rising sea levels and the next big storm. >> if sandy were to come close or directly into norfolk i think we'd all be in big trouble. >> brown: we assess the latest diplomatic moves to end syria's war, as secretary of state hillary clinton meets with russia's foreign minister. >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a program that aims to put students at low-achieving schools on a path to high school graduation. >> we're here to make things better. we're here to tutor kids. we're here to make sure that they stay on track. we are here to make sure that they graduate. we want to prepare them for high school. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for
year, isaac in august and recently sandy. each storm brought a grim reminder of yet one more ever-present disaster: the deadly cholera epidemic that started ten months after the quake. at the cholera ward of saint luke's hospital just outside the capital port-au-prince, this doctor says since hurricane sandy admissions have doubled from 20 to 40 patients each day. >> most of the new cases are coming from further up the hill in places where we had not seen them before. i'm not positive but perhaps the wells there have been contaminated. >> reporter: experts believe cholera was brought here by u.n. peacekeepers. untreated sewage from this base flowed into a tributary of the river, the major source of water for both washing and drinking. cholera is spread by fecal-oral contact. two years on 200,000 patients have been sickened, 750 d 7,500 have died from diarrhea and fluid loss. each flood brings more contaminated water, more cases. the epidemic prompted massive relief efforts and public campaigns. on the streets and in classrooms promoting hygiene and sanitation. fatalities have drop
, the country created 146,000 jobs, exceeding expectations in the wake of hurricane sandy. further progress will be tested as the fiscal cliff deadline approaches without a deal inside yet. i'm very pleased to have jeff immelt back on this program. welcome >> charlie, thanks, good to be back with you. >> rose: we've talked many times about g.e. since you took over, i think once since -- just after 2001. where is the company today in terms of where do you want it to be and where do you want it to be in the next five years? >> i think, charlie, what we've tried to do is simplify the portfolio into infrastructure and financial services. we like where the portfolio is today. we think in the infrastructure space there's going to be roughly $4 trillion spent each year, so it's an attractive big market. globally is where our opportunities are so the company's -- probably a decade ago 30% of our revenues were outside the united states. now it's more like 60% or 65%. so we think we've got the portfolio we want. we've dramatically increased the amount of technology. and in the end i think technology
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)